GSN

Faces of GSN

Christina “Chrissy” Ricks (Published in May 2016 GSN Newsletter)

I grew up in Spokane, Washington and went to Lewis and Clark High School, located in downtown Spokane. I always loved rocks as a child, but I was a little more interested in archaeology and anthropol-ogy. It wasn’t until I was a young woman that I realized that geology was the career path I desired. I decided in the winter of 2005 that I was going to major in geology, after having taken a little over a year off after I graduated with an Associate of Arts degree to work at Sally’s House for the Salvation Army. Sally’s House is an emergency receiving foster care facility. Though this type of work is rewarding, as it deals with helping children, I soon realized that the foster care world was not my calling.

I graduated from Eastern Washington University’s geology program in the spring of 2008. During my studies as a geologist, I was privi-leged to work at the USGS in Spokane, WA for a few years aiding in the office and helping the geophysical crews out of Golden, Colorado for a little over two years. As a student geologist, I also worked at Teck Cominco’s Pend Oreille Mine, located in NE Washington State logging core. I was appointed geology club president for two years, and was a teaching assistant for EWU’s field camp in the spring/early summer 2008.

After I graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Geology, I went to work for Agnico Eagle on their West Pe-quop Project located in the Pequop Mountains in NE Nevada. I have worked on the project for most of my short career along with the Summit Project, also located in the Pequop Mountains, and north of Long Canyon. I have spent a short stint in the Yukon where I aided Agnico on a tungsten-moly porphyry system, which was an exciting change from the typical Carlin-type I have been working in.

I admire the people of Agnico Eagle as this company has provided to me a sturdy and structured foundation that has allowed me to grow as a geologist and as a person over the years in ways words cannot express. After the death of my twin brother in early 2013, this company of-fered support and guidance through this tough period in my life, of which I am so thankful. Through both Ag-nico Eagle and the GSN, I have met countless com-mendable geologists and people of this mining and exploration industry that have left a positive and lasting impact. I have vis-ited numerous mines and properties around Nevada State through Agnico and by attending GSN field trips. I hope to at-tend many more in the future!

One of my most memorable experiences while working in in-dustry was that I had lined the drill rig 180 degrees off the poorly indicated azimuth by accident. The hole ended up be-ing the highest grade intercept and one of the longest inter-cepts of the season, and this prompted more drilling around the hole. The interesting thing is, once the rig pointed and drilled in the proposed direction, it came out as a dud hole. Shows you how ‘luck’ can be a necessary component to this industry!